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Rum Cay Yacht Charter Guide

The Rolling Hills Of The Bahamas

Believed to be the second port of call on the famous tour of Christopher Columbus, the island of Rum Cay is recognized for its historical nature and picturesque rolling hills.

Reasons to Visit

Rum Cay

Ancient cave drawings from 500 AD
Famous wreckage of the HMS Conqueror
60 ft wall dive known as the grand canyon
Breathtaking vistas from rolling hills and uscious greenery
Coral reefs teeming with aquatic life

Good For

  • Snorkeling
  • Monuments
  • Marine Life
  • Nature
  • Diving
  • Anchorage
  • Mountains

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Previously home to Arawak Indians, the island of Rum Cay is one of the hidden secrets of the Bahamas chain. At only 10 miles long and with only one inhabited village the atmosphere is calm and collected but vibrant with the Bahamian way of life. 

Though there are two theories behind the name of the island, one being that the island was named after a shipwreck which carried rum; and the other being an honorary name after the Isle of Rhum in Scotland, the true history of the island is written in stone with cave drawings left behind by the Indians from as far back as 500 AD in Hartford Cave. Located in the heart of the island, guests can visit the cave at any point of the day and take a trip back in time. 

Port Nelson is the inhabited village on the island. With only a small population, much of the trade for the island is made here. Many of the residents work at the harbour and the select cafes offer some amazing Bahamian lunches, freshly caught in the surrounding waters. You will also find a few beach bars peppered around the coast where you can take your tender for a refreshing cocktail under the Caribbean sun.

Taking a walk across the island you will come across some stunning scenery which looks like it has been transferred from the mountains. Rolling hills covered in luscious green forests and dotted peaks rising to 150 feet give the interior of the island a magical feel and create a great spot for a picnic.

Like its close-by neighbour, San Salvador, the island of Rum Cay sports many sites for diving and snorkelling. The deep reefs and drop-offs surrounding the island are suitable for many levels of diving experience and allow you to see some of the most beautiful displays of coral in the area.

A main point of interest when exploring the coral formations is to visit the Grand Canyon. Standing at 60 feet and almost breaching the water's surface this wall dive is spectacular and shouldn't be missed if you are visiting Rum Cay.

For a mesmerizing dive, you cannot get much better than the wreckage of the HMS Conqueror. Otherwise known as the underwater museum of the Bahamas, this is a must-see attraction for all visitors. Built in Devon, England, in 1855 the warship fought in the Crimean war and sank in 1861.

Lying in only 30 feet of water this dive is suitable for all types of diver and is a great starting point for a first-time wreck explorer. On inspecting the wreck you can expect to see some of the guns, ship chains, hawser holes, and even the shaft. Due to being the property of the Bahamian government, none of the contents can be removed but all visitors are welcome to take many pictures.

Combine the exciting underwater adventures at Rum Cay with an itinerary exploring the surrounding area by viewing the entire fleet of superyachts available for Bahamas yacht charters.

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Photo Tour of Rum Cay

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